Investment Trusts

The Company’s principal investment objective is to achieve capital growth through investment primarily in equities of companies located in the continent of Asia (excluding the Middle East and Japan), together with the Far Eastern countries bordering the Pacific Ocean, with the aim of achieving growth in excess of the MSCI All Countries Asia excluding Japan Index in Sterling terms (Benchmark Index) over the longer term.

The Company has built a strong long-term performance record targeting attractive investment opportunities across Asian equity markets. Providing exposure to Asia’s superior long-term growth potential, the Company leverages the local knowledge of Schroders’ extensive network of analysts in the region and has been managed by Matthew Dobbs since launch in 1995.

Past performance is not a guide to future performance and may not be repeated. The value of investments and the income from them may go down as well as up and investors may not get back the amount originally invested.

 

 

 Performance

Schroder AsiaPacific Fund plcQ3 2013-Q3 2014Q3 2012-Q3 2013Q3 2011-Q3 2012Q3 2010-Q3 2011Q3 2009-Q3 2010
NAV total return 10.8 0.3 30.2 -8.3 28.1
Share price total return 11.1 2.9 25.6 -5.4 23.9
Benchmark total return** 8.1 5.0 15.4 -11.8 20.4

Source: Schroders, bid to bid price with net income reinvested, in GBP, as at 30 September 2014. *In January 2011 the MSCI AC Asia ex Japan (NDR) replaced the MSCI AC FE ex-Japan Net (TR). The full track record of the previous index has been kept and chainlinked to the new one. **MSCI AC Asia ex Japan (NDR) total return.

 

What are the risks?

  • Past performance is not a guide to future performance and may not be repeated. The value of investments and the income from them may go down as well as up and investors may not get back the amount originally invested.
  • Investors in the emerging markets and the Far East should be aware that this involves a high degree of risk and should be seen as long term in nature. Less developed markets are generally less well regulated than the UK, they may be less liquid and may have less reliable arrangements for trading and settlement of the underlying holdings.
  • The Company holds investments denominated in currencies other than sterling, investors should note that exchange rates may cause the value of these investments, and the income from them, to rise or fall.
  • The Company invests in smaller companies that may be less liquid than in larger companies and price swings may therefore be greater than investment trusts that invest in larger companies.
  • The Company may borrow money to invest in further investments, this is known as gearing. Gearing will increase returns if the value of the investments purchased increase in value by more than the cost of borrowing, or reduce returns if they fail to do so.
  • Investments such as warrants, participation certificates, guaranteed bonds, etc will expose the fund to the risk of the issuer of these instruments defaulting on paying the capital back to the fund.

Source for rating: Morningstar as at 31 July 2014